Babes of 1916 donates to pantry

The Babes of 1916 senior softball league donated $1,000 to help the Rotary Club of Solon feed needy families through its food pantry program.

The Solon-based Babes of 1916 is a nonprofit organization that has been playing for 36 years in the city. Named for the birth year of the league’s founders, the group fields seven teams of men 65 or older at Solon Community Park for seven-inning games. Each team plays 32 games a year. More than two years ago, team members joined volunteers at the food pantry, which distributes thousands of pounds of food each month.

“Since the Babes of 1916 became involved volunteering at your food pantry, we found a deep connection to your cause,” group President Bob Herman said recently. “We are honored to present you with a $1,000 contribution with the hope it will help provide you with the resources you need to continue your endeavors, especially now during the COVID-19 crisis that has impacted so many families in our community. Your tireless commitment to the Solon community is greatly appreciated.”

Tri-C resumes police academy

Cuyahoga Community College has resumed face-to-face training at its Police Academy seven weeks after suspending on-site instruction amidst the COVID-19 outbreak.

Cadets returned Monday to Tri-C’s KeyBank Public Safety Training Center at Western Campus. They are the first group to restart classes on campus since the College halted in-person instruction in March.  As part of the reopening, Tri-C’s program adopted safe distancing measures and precautions recommended by health officials.  

The College also conducted online orientations with students and instructors prior to classes reconvening to discuss using best practices to minimize the potential risk of COVID-19 exposure.

 Those steps and Northeast Ohio’s critical need for first responders led to the decision to bring cadets back to the training center, said Clayton Harris, Tri-C’s dean of public safety.

“Our cadets were excited to return and pursue their career ambitions,” Harris said. “They’re needed now, and we’re doing everything we can to allow them to complete their training so they can serve the community.”

Tri-C offers tuition assistance

Cuyahoga Community College last week announced a full tuition assistance program to offset academic and workforce training costs for Cuyahoga County residents facing financial hardship due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The program will cover tuition for new or returning Tri-C students with financial needs that intensified during the pandemic response. Only Cuyahoga County residents are eligible.

The funding can be used toward academic credit courses or workforce training programs. Students can begin the program this summer or fall, with funding available for three consecutive sessions.

 Assistance can cover up to one year of academic courses or the full length of a workforce training program.

“These are uncertain times, but people don’t have to put their futures on hold,” Tri-C President Alex Johnson said. “Thanks to the generous support of Tri-C Foundation donors, this program will allow people to earn a degree or credential in a high-demand field that pays a family-sustaining wage without incurring any tuition costs.”

 The program serves to increase access to Tri-C for a variety of groups affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, including people who lost their jobs due to COVID-19, graduating high school students that were heading to a four-year college, current students enrolled in a four-year college and cannot afford to return.

Students should visit tri-c.edu/tuitionassistance or call 216-987-6000 for more information or to begin the application process.

 The program is being financed through generous donations to the Cuyahoga Community College Foundation, including major gifts such as the $500,000 donation from Anne-Marie and Sam Petros that created the Petros Family Student Relief Fund.

Visit tri-c.edu/give to contribute to the Full Tuition Assistance program and help students achieve their academic and workforce training goals.

Funds available to nonprofits

Geauga County has been awarded federal funds made available through the Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency under the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program. Geauga County has been chosen to receive $94,539 to supplement emergency food and shelter programs in the county.

The selection was made by a national board chaired by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency and consists of representatives from American Red Cross; Catholic Charities, USA; National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA; The Jewish Federations of North America, The Salvation Army; and United Way Worldwide. The local board will determine how the funds are awarded to the county and distributed among the emergency food and shelter programs run by local service agencies in the area.

Local agencies chosen to receive funds must: be private, voluntary nonprofits or units of government; be eligible to receive federal funds, have an accounting system, practice nondiscrimination, have demonstrated the capability to deliver emergency food and/or shelter programs; and, if they are a private, voluntary organization, have a voluntary board.

Voluntary agencies interested in applying for emergency food and shelter program funds can contact Claudia Toth for more information at 209 Center St., Unit H. Chardon, Ohio 44024, 216-436-2028 or ctoth@uws.org. The deadline for letters of application to be received is May 22.

Woodcraft donated to task force

The Geauga Hunger Task Force announced Monday that they received a $15,000 donation from Woodcraft Industries of Geauga County.

The task force stated that the company is known for creating woodwork for 65 years and donated the funds to help provide food to neighbors in need during the pandemic.

“Though we are in uncertain times that can be a little frightening, it also can be an opportunity to see how many caring people and businesses we have in Geauga County,” the nonprofit stated in a press release.

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